Official anti-derail thread

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic chat' started by Ladysphinx, Jun 5, 2017.

  1. Super Sywurm

    Super Sywurm Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    587
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Kimberley, Northern Cape
    I don't want them all dead, just less in quantity.
     
  2. Guest




  3. Hendre

    Hendre Polypterus freak

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,629
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Cape town
    I have got them out before breeding size mostly. So very few left
     
  4. Super Sywurm

    Super Sywurm Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    587
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Kimberley, Northern Cape
    It seems that the wild birds in my garden do not eat snails.
     
  5. Jwh

    Jwh Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,668
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Pretoria
    Easiest way to reduce snails is to reduce the amount you feed, reason you have an overpopulation is due to overfeeding.
    A sure way to remove all snails is to add copper to the tank, your plants, other invertebrates and some fish will not like that at all, slightly friendlier method is to use salt. If you kill snails this way they'll rot in the tank and at the levels you have will probably cause a serious ammonia spike.
    The birds have probably never encountered a snail in their lives and don't recognize it as a food source
     
  6. Super Sywurm

    Super Sywurm Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    587
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Kimberley, Northern Cape
    The amount of snails is not due to overfeeding, I got this tank from another guy with the snails.
     
  7. Pierré Schoonraad

    Pierré Schoonraad Rainbow Freak

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,851
    Likes Received:
    549
    Location:
    Rietfontein, Pretoria
    They burrow into the substrate so they won't be visible during the day. Just don't use a snail killer. That is the fastes way to get an amonia spike going in your tank.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
     
  8. MariaS

    MariaS Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Messages:
    3,486
    Likes Received:
    551
    Location:
    Klipriver, Midvaal
    In order to not use medicines, although will take some time (I have never had to test it) some people say and i have read in numeous other forums.. place lettuce leaves or maybe cabbage as its a bit harder and wont disintegrate so quick, in the tank during the night
    Apparently early morning the leaves will be covered in snails which you remove and put in new leaves for the night
    Its worth a try
     
  9. Pezulu

    Pezulu Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2015
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    Centurion
    Assassin Snails.
    They will soon start making a dent on the snail population, and it is completely natural.
    All you have to do then is remove the empty shells if you don't want to leave them in the tank.
     
  10. Super Sywurm

    Super Sywurm Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    587
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Kimberley, Northern Cape
    Ja, this works.
     
  11. f-fish

    f-fish Well Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    Messages:
    7,017
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    JHB - Randburg
    Good to be alive ... somedays youtube get's it soooooo right, ok they are few but still.



    Funky minimal ..... aaaaahhhhhhh
     
  12. f-fish

    f-fish Well Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    Messages:
    7,017
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    JHB - Randburg
    Yes ... made it another week clapped !!!!!! Being using Silaz to get the blood going in the mornings.
     
  13. Hendre

    Hendre Polypterus freak

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,629
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Cape town
    Let's put it here
     
  14. Hendre

    Hendre Polypterus freak

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,629
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Cape town
    We appear to have a ray on the continent

    Dasyatis garouaensis
     
  15. Reedfish

    Reedfish Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Messages:
    8,625
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    UK
    If I may make a suggestion.....
    Rather than lose something useful in a chit-chat thread, why don't you start a new thread on shark and ray biology in the oddball section.
     
    Hendre likes this.
  16. MariaS

    MariaS Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Messages:
    3,486
    Likes Received:
    551
    Location:
    Klipriver, Midvaal
    I was going to do that latter was just tossing around some thoughts on what to do

    But @Hendre beat me to it!!! I should have known he would be FAST!! Hahaha..
     
    Hendre likes this.
  17. Hendre

    Hendre Polypterus freak

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,629
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Cape town
    Very little known on these... Will contact someone on another forum

    Interestingly these live almost exclusively on insect larvae
     
  18. Reedfish

    Reedfish Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Messages:
    8,625
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    UK
    Contributing from your own knowledge......
     
  19. MariaS

    MariaS Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Messages:
    3,486
    Likes Received:
    551
    Location:
    Klipriver, Midvaal

    there is a lot of info on the net about them
    I didn't find it worth adding to my species list as they not popular as aquarium fish due to their dullness etc and they are also on the Red LIST as they endangered and not being bred in captivity so not readily available

    The Niger stingray or smooth freshwater stingray, Dasyatis garouaensis, is a species of stingray in the family Dasyatidae, native to rivers in Nigeria and Cameroon. Attaining a width of 40 cm (16 in), this species can be distinguished by its thin, almost circular pectoral fin disk, slightly projecting snout tip, and mostly smooth skin with small or absent dermal denticles. The Niger stingray feeds on aquatic insect larvae and is ovoviviparous. The long stinging spine on the tail of this ray can inflict a painful wound. It has been assessed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), as its numbers are declining in some areas and it faces heavy fishing pressure and habitat degradation
     
    Reedfish likes this.
  20. Hendre

    Hendre Polypterus freak

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    1,629
    Likes Received:
    379
    Location:
    Cape town
    Not much that I know really
    I couldn't see much, mostly scientific listing. Currently listed as vulnerable, possibly due to lower reproduction after a dam was built
     
  21. Reedfish

    Reedfish Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Messages:
    8,625
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    UK
    That's my point
     

Recent Posts

Share This Page